Ask a question to find out more

Respect for human rights

African woman embracing her baby girl

As a result of its work over the years, Eni ranked third overall in the extractive and apparel sectors and second among energy companies in the 2023 Corporate Human Rights Benchmark (CHRB) held by the World Benchmark Alliance (WBA). The benchmark assesses what companies are doing to ensure respect for human rights through their policies, processes and practices, based on publicly available information. As well as recognizing the solidity of the model of integrating respect for human rights into corporate processes, the benchmark highlights how Eni stands out in giving centrality to its stakeholders, engaging them and taking their opinions into account in shaping and improving its approach to human rights. Within the 2023 Gender Assessment conducted by WBA on a sample of over 1000 companies, Eni is one of the two companies with the highest score.

The principles and practices that underpin our commitment

We believe it is our duty to improve the well-being of the people in the countries where we work, respecting their dignity and striving for a just and inclusive transition. The terms of our commitment are set out in our Code of Ethics, in the new policy "Respect for Human Rights in Eni"* approved by Eni’s Board of Directors, and in the Supplier Code of Conduct. These documents contain the guiding principles that shape our actions and the expectations we have of those who work with us. These principles are also referred to in the Global Framework Agreement on Industrial Relations at an international level and on Corporate Social Responsibility.  

We confirm our commitment also by adhering to the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs), the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises (OECD Guidelines) and the Principles on Security and Human Rights. We actively participate as a Full Corporate Member in the Voluntary Principles Initiative (VPI), a multi-stakeholder project focused on respect for human rights in the management of security operations.

 

* the Policy repeals the pre-existing “Eni’s Statement on Respect for Human Rights”

We need to build a resilient hu­man rights system and each of us is called to play its part. As Eni, we strongly feel this impera­tive and we concretely support a just transition focusing on workers, suppliers, communities and customers to create a responsible, shared and widespread human rights culture together with our stakeholders.

Eni routinely monitors its human rights activities

We are committed to conducting due diligence on our human rights activities. We consistently assess and monitor both actual and potential impacts, and identify specific strategies and solutions to increase the effectiveness of preventing and mitigating negative impacts. This includes providing specific instructions and specialised training to employees as well as targeted awareness initiatives for subcontractors and other partners.

The main themes concerning Human Rights

Our areas of interest in the field of human rights, divided by category and areas of implementation.

Human rights in the workplace Human rights in contracting and procurement Human rights in communities Human Rights and Security
Discrimination and equal treatment based on religion, ethnicity and gender Modern day slavery Land rights Excessive use of force by public and private security forces
Safe and healthy working conditions Migrant workers Environmental impacts resulting in impacts on livelihood, health, water availability of communities and Indigenous Peoples Employee security in high-risk environments
Freedom of association and Collective bargaining Freedom of association and Collective bargaining Project closure
Working conditions (wages and working hours)
Safe and healthy working conditions

The most significant themes

In line with the UNGPs, we have identified the key issues relevant to our business activities and operating contexts and organised them into four priority areas for action.

Human rights in the workplace

We apply the principles set out in the International Labour Organization's (ILO) Tripartite Declaration on Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy: 

  • freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining 

  • the elimination of all forms of forced or compulsory labour 

  • the effective abolition of child labour 

  • the elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation 

 

We are committed to ensuring decent working conditions and a work environment free from all forms of discrimination or abuse, by establishing working relationships characterised by fairness, equality, non-discrimination, care and respect for the dignity of the individual, as reflected in Eni's policy against violence and harassment in the workplace.

In 2021 we have endorsed the UN Women Empowerment Principles (WEP) to emphasise our commitment to promoting gender equality and empowering women, as outlined in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the 17 SDGs. After adhering to the WEPs, Eni initiated self-assessment process of its performance based on the Gender Gap Analysis Tool, which led to the development of an Action Plan. This is the basis for building a more comprehensive approach to gender equality and women's empowerment in all areas of the company.

The supply chain

Our strategy is aimed at ensuring the full commitment of the entire supply chain to upholding human rights. This includes not only specific assessments and contractual requirements, but also engaging suppliers in initiatives to effectively obtain and monitor human rights awareness and attention.

Learn more about relations with suppliers

We seek to ensure that our partners adhere to the principles set out in our commitment documents. Every effort is made to include ad hoc human rights clauses in contractual agreements related to activities carried out with or for Eni. 

Local communities

We respect the rights of individuals and local communities in the countries where we work, focusing in particular on the protection of the environment and biodiversity, on the preservation of local cultures and the right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. We protect the right to access to water, to ownership and use of land and natural resources.

We are committed to respecting the specific rights of indigenous peoples in accordance with international standards, the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention (ILO169) and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

Before initiating our business or local development activities, we conduct prior, free and informed consultations with stakeholders to meet their legitimate expectations regarding the design and implementation of activities and their participation.

For industrial projects considered to be at higher risk, we conduct specific studies, Human Rights Impact Assessments (HRIAs), to identify potential negative impacts, recommendations and prevention and mitigation measures, which are translated into concrete action plans.

Security

In line with international reference standards, the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights and the United Nations Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials, we have developed a coherent set of rules and tools to be followed by all security personnel protecting Eni employees and facilities. This ensures that:

  • contractual terms include provisions on respect for human rights
  • suppliers of security providers are selected on the basis of human rights considerations, among other criteria
  • security operators and supervisors receive appropriate training on respect for human rights
  • events that are considered to be at greater risk are handled in accordance with international standards.

 

The most significant themes

In line with the UNGPs, we have identified the key issues relevant to our business activities and operating contexts and organised them into four priority areas for action.

Human rights in the workplace

We apply the principles set out in the International Labour Organization's (ILO) Tripartite Declaration on Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy: 

  • freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining 

  • the elimination of all forms of forced or compulsory labour 

  • the effective abolition of child labour 

  • the elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation 

 

We are committed to ensuring decent working conditions and a work environment free from all forms of discrimination or abuse, by establishing working relationships characterised by fairness, equality, non-discrimination, care and respect for the dignity of the individual, as reflected in Eni's policy against violence and harassment in the workplace.

In 2021 we have endorsed the UN Women Empowerment Principles (WEP) to emphasise our commitment to promoting gender equality and empowering women, as outlined in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the 17 SDGs. After adhering to the WEPs, Eni initiated self-assessment process of its performance based on the Gender Gap Analysis Tool, which led to the development of an Action Plan. This is the basis for building a more comprehensive approach to gender equality and women's empowerment in all areas of the company.

The supply chain

Our strategy is aimed at ensuring the full commitment of the entire supply chain to upholding human rights. This includes not only specific assessments and contractual requirements, but also engaging suppliers in initiatives to effectively obtain and monitor human rights awareness and attention.

Learn more about relations with suppliers

We seek to ensure that our partners adhere to the principles set out in our commitment documents. Every effort is made to include ad hoc human rights clauses in contractual agreements related to activities carried out with or for Eni. 

Local communities

We respect the rights of individuals and local communities in the countries where we work, focusing in particular on the protection of the environment and biodiversity, on the preservation of local cultures and the right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. We protect the right to access to water, to ownership and use of land and natural resources.

We are committed to respecting the specific rights of indigenous peoples in accordance with international standards, the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention (ILO169) and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

Before initiating our business or local development activities, we conduct prior, free and informed consultations with stakeholders to meet their legitimate expectations regarding the design and implementation of activities and their participation.

For industrial projects considered to be at higher risk, we conduct specific studies, Human Rights Impact Assessments (HRIAs), to identify potential negative impacts, recommendations and prevention and mitigation measures, which are translated into concrete action plans.

Security

In line with international reference standards, the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights and the United Nations Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials, we have developed a coherent set of rules and tools to be followed by all security personnel protecting Eni employees and facilities. This ensures that:

  • contractual terms include provisions on respect for human rights
  • suppliers of security providers are selected on the basis of human rights considerations, among other criteria
  • security operators and supervisors receive appropriate training on respect for human rights
  • events that are considered to be at greater risk are handled in accordance with international standards.

 

Case studies

Eni and the Voluntary Principles Initiative (VPI) on Security & Human Rights

Context

In 2022, Eni acquired the status of “Full Member” of the VPI, a multi-stakeholder initiative that brings together leading energy companies for the protection and promotion of human rights. This recognition has further expanded and strengthened Eni’s commitment through the realisation of multiple activities: such as the initiation and implementation of ad hoc projects, the realisation of annual tasks such as the drafting of the Report in which the activities carried out are highlighted, and the participation in the Annual Plenary Meetings, in which security and human rights issues are discussed from various points of view.

Activity

Among the most significant activities in 2023 is the application in Mozambique of the Conflict Analysis Tool, a project proposed and prepared by the VPI to analyse the causes of conflict in a given area/Country starting from the identification of the causes that most contribute to exacerbating the conflict, followed by the identify possible actions to mitigate the causes. Eni’s activities involved desk analysis, local engagement through interviews, identification of conflict factors and their prioritisation, and the identification of Mitigation Options in line with the methodology developed by VPI in the “Conflict Analysis Tool for Companies” document.

Next steps

In 2024, the implementation of the Conflict Analysis Tool in Mozambique is expected to be completed: drafting of the final document and submission to the Voluntary Principles Initiative

Assessing Human Rights Risk with in the supply chain

From the application of the risk-model of Eni’s procurement process, an on-site audit was conducted in a high-risk African Country on a local supplier working in a critical sector for employees’ human rights. The aim of the inspection was to evaluate the supplier’s human rights management in highlighting its strong and weak points.

The assessment

The assessment was conducted to evaluate the human rights practices of a supplier, employing various engagement methods. The process started with the supplier’s active involvement, encouraging open communication and cooperation throughout the assessment. An on-site visit was conducted to gain knowledge of the supplier’s operations and work environment. The working conditions were observed to assess compliance with human rights standards. Furthermore, interviews were conducted with both managers and workers such as to gain valuable insights into their experiences and perspectives. Additionally, a comprehensive review of the company’s policies and procedures was conducted through the examination of relevant documents. An analysis of the company records for the last three years was performed, focusing on sensitive documents so as to ensure thoroughness. Finally, the assessment results were shared with the supplier, and a well-defined improvement action plan was developed to address any identified gaps, thereby promoting continuous enhancement of human rights practices.

Key audit and nonconformities

From the assessment different nonconformities and findings resulted: there were delays in the payment of contributions for pension funds and delays in payments of salaries. Moreover, it was observed that most of the employees were not aware or instructed in regularly checking their pension funds accounts to ensure that their contributions were up to date.

Action plan

The findings underscored improvement areas in the supplier’s financial practices and employee engagement. Thus, the following action plan was requested to the supplier. First and foremost, a root cause analysis was performed to verify why salaries and contributions were credited in delay, and consequently, evidence of resulting corrective actions was asked to supplier. The supplier was also requested to provide the contract holder monthly with evidence to prove that contributions and salaries have been credited to the employees’ accounts in a timely manner. Furthermore, to increase the employees’ alertness, the vendor was solicited to provide the hired hand a specific training session regarding their funds and salary accounts.

Success story

Thanks to the shared action plan, improvement in human rights management was obtained from the supplier with the requested period of time. From the evidence provided during the assessment’s follow up phase, the issues with the payments of pension funds resulted closed and no further complaints were received. This demonstrated a significant growth in the financial management of the supplier’s operations. An improvement in the prompt payment of the pension funds was noticed, as well as the timely payment of salaries. Detailed documentation to ensure proper tracking of payments and better contract administration was provided by the contractor proving progress as regards managing obligations. Lastly, the employees of the supplier resulted in being competent in checking the status of their statements and accounts. Overall, these improvements demonstrate the supplier’s commitment to addressing the issues identified during the assessment, resulting in enhanced payment processes, better documentation practices, and increased employee engagement in financial matters. This case study represents an example of how Eni approaches human rights management within the supply chain. The strategy in facing human rights violation is based up on the supplier’s active engagement, collaboration and clear communication. Eni monitors the implementation of the defined action plan in considering the above-mentioned principles. Not all of the assessments result in a success story like the one described in the case study: vendors that do not result as being compliant with the requested corrective action are subjected to exclusion from Eni vendor lists and so all of their business is interrupted.

The Implementation of the Human Rights Action Plan in Mexico

In 2022 Eni has conducted a follow-up analysis of the 2019-2021 Human Rights Action Plan (HRAP) developed by Eni Mexico for Area 1 Development, following the 2019 Human Rights Impact Assessment (HRIA) conducted by the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR).

 

The assessment has focused on the five component areas identified by the HRIA and associated actions defined by the Human Right Action Plan: Accountability and transparency of the HRIA; Local communities; Fishers; Workplace, with a focus on contractor and subcontractor management, and local employment; Security. The methodology has included a desktop review of all Eni documentation related to the assessment and management of human rights impacts (including impact assessments and plans, stakeholder engagement and communication documents, strategies, and plans - full list in the Annex) and interviews with both Eni colleagues and external stakeholders (local government, community representatives, fishing cooperatives, and local civil society organisations). For this follow up activity, interviews with community and government external stakeholders have been conducted on the field, among them local communities, fishing cooperatives and contractors’ workersa.

 

Some of the interviews with local communities took place in Villahermosa, Sanchez Magallanes, and other communities near Area 1 and many of the interviewed stakeholders were the same who were consulted at the time of the original HRIA field work. The study, whose results are still being finalized and whose outcomes will be published via ad hoc document, acknowledge the activities carried out for each component and provides an analysis of the outcomes and observation by the consultants. The latter then inform the recommendations, which are aimed at strengthening and improving the effectiveness of Eni’s Human Rights Action Plan activities. The issues discussed during consultations and interview campaigns have mainly involved: communication about the project, strengthened engagement, compensation management, accessibility of grievance mechanism and other company’s channels.

 

All the inputs are being processed and analysed and will be considered for programming next activities in the area. Among the feedback received, fishers reported that fishing boats have to travel out further from the coast with, as a result, an increasing in gasoline use and overall costs. The situation, which is caused by different factors (including overexploitation), is being managed by Eni through different activities, such as incorporating fishers in its local development program, granting fisher’s equipment, and developing projects on alternatives to improve the productivity of the fishing sector. In this regard, interviews have also reported the need of better explaining and describe these activities to communities, to make sure the benefit are not perceived as not distributed fairly. Eni will work on improving its communication and engagement strategy with them.

 

 

a) Among the stakeholders consulted: Asociación de Padres de Familia de Sánchez Magallanes; Asociación de Padres de Familia de San Rafael; Capitánia de Puerto de Sánchez Magallanes; CONAPESCA (Comisión Nacional de Acuacultura y Pesca); Municipio de Cardenas - Departamento Jurídico; Municipal delegates of Ojoshal and Villa y Puerto Andrés Sánchez Magallanes; PROEDU Community Worker (Sánchez Magallanes y San Rafael); Sánchez Magallanes Health Centre; Secretaría de Desarrollo Agropecuario, Forestal y Pesca del Estado de Tabasco (SEDAFOP); Secretaría para el Desarrollo Energético del Estado de Tabasco (SEDENER); Fishing cooperatives; Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco (UJAT); Zona Escolar, 46 teachers and 46 Supervisor.

Case studies

Eni and the Voluntary Principles Initiative (VPI) on Security & Human Rights

Context

In 2022, Eni acquired the status of “Full Member” of the VPI, a multi-stakeholder initiative that brings together leading energy companies for the protection and promotion of human rights. This recognition has further expanded and strengthened Eni’s commitment through the realisation of multiple activities: such as the initiation and implementation of ad hoc projects, the realisation of annual tasks such as the drafting of the Report in which the activities carried out are highlighted, and the participation in the Annual Plenary Meetings, in which security and human rights issues are discussed from various points of view.

Activity

Among the most significant activities in 2023 is the application in Mozambique of the Conflict Analysis Tool, a project proposed and prepared by the VPI to analyse the causes of conflict in a given area/Country starting from the identification of the causes that most contribute to exacerbating the conflict, followed by the identify possible actions to mitigate the causes. Eni’s activities involved desk analysis, local engagement through interviews, identification of conflict factors and their prioritisation, and the identification of Mitigation Options in line with the methodology developed by VPI in the “Conflict Analysis Tool for Companies” document.

Next steps

In 2024, the implementation of the Conflict Analysis Tool in Mozambique is expected to be completed: drafting of the final document and submission to the Voluntary Principles Initiative

Assessing Human Rights Risk with in the supply chain

From the application of the risk-model of Eni’s procurement process, an on-site audit was conducted in a high-risk African Country on a local supplier working in a critical sector for employees’ human rights. The aim of the inspection was to evaluate the supplier’s human rights management in highlighting its strong and weak points.

The assessment

The assessment was conducted to evaluate the human rights practices of a supplier, employing various engagement methods. The process started with the supplier’s active involvement, encouraging open communication and cooperation throughout the assessment. An on-site visit was conducted to gain knowledge of the supplier’s operations and work environment. The working conditions were observed to assess compliance with human rights standards. Furthermore, interviews were conducted with both managers and workers such as to gain valuable insights into their experiences and perspectives. Additionally, a comprehensive review of the company’s policies and procedures was conducted through the examination of relevant documents. An analysis of the company records for the last three years was performed, focusing on sensitive documents so as to ensure thoroughness. Finally, the assessment results were shared with the supplier, and a well-defined improvement action plan was developed to address any identified gaps, thereby promoting continuous enhancement of human rights practices.

Key audit and nonconformities

From the assessment different nonconformities and findings resulted: there were delays in the payment of contributions for pension funds and delays in payments of salaries. Moreover, it was observed that most of the employees were not aware or instructed in regularly checking their pension funds accounts to ensure that their contributions were up to date.

Action plan

The findings underscored improvement areas in the supplier’s financial practices and employee engagement. Thus, the following action plan was requested to the supplier. First and foremost, a root cause analysis was performed to verify why salaries and contributions were credited in delay, and consequently, evidence of resulting corrective actions was asked to supplier. The supplier was also requested to provide the contract holder monthly with evidence to prove that contributions and salaries have been credited to the employees’ accounts in a timely manner. Furthermore, to increase the employees’ alertness, the vendor was solicited to provide the hired hand a specific training session regarding their funds and salary accounts.

Success story

Thanks to the shared action plan, improvement in human rights management was obtained from the supplier with the requested period of time. From the evidence provided during the assessment’s follow up phase, the issues with the payments of pension funds resulted closed and no further complaints were received. This demonstrated a significant growth in the financial management of the supplier’s operations. An improvement in the prompt payment of the pension funds was noticed, as well as the timely payment of salaries. Detailed documentation to ensure proper tracking of payments and better contract administration was provided by the contractor proving progress as regards managing obligations. Lastly, the employees of the supplier resulted in being competent in checking the status of their statements and accounts. Overall, these improvements demonstrate the supplier’s commitment to addressing the issues identified during the assessment, resulting in enhanced payment processes, better documentation practices, and increased employee engagement in financial matters. This case study represents an example of how Eni approaches human rights management within the supply chain. The strategy in facing human rights violation is based up on the supplier’s active engagement, collaboration and clear communication. Eni monitors the implementation of the defined action plan in considering the above-mentioned principles. Not all of the assessments result in a success story like the one described in the case study: vendors that do not result as being compliant with the requested corrective action are subjected to exclusion from Eni vendor lists and so all of their business is interrupted.

The Implementation of the Human Rights Action Plan in Mexico

In 2022 Eni has conducted a follow-up analysis of the 2019-2021 Human Rights Action Plan (HRAP) developed by Eni Mexico for Area 1 Development, following the 2019 Human Rights Impact Assessment (HRIA) conducted by the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR).

 

The assessment has focused on the five component areas identified by the HRIA and associated actions defined by the Human Right Action Plan: Accountability and transparency of the HRIA; Local communities; Fishers; Workplace, with a focus on contractor and subcontractor management, and local employment; Security. The methodology has included a desktop review of all Eni documentation related to the assessment and management of human rights impacts (including impact assessments and plans, stakeholder engagement and communication documents, strategies, and plans - full list in the Annex) and interviews with both Eni colleagues and external stakeholders (local government, community representatives, fishing cooperatives, and local civil society organisations). For this follow up activity, interviews with community and government external stakeholders have been conducted on the field, among them local communities, fishing cooperatives and contractors’ workersa.

 

Some of the interviews with local communities took place in Villahermosa, Sanchez Magallanes, and other communities near Area 1 and many of the interviewed stakeholders were the same who were consulted at the time of the original HRIA field work. The study, whose results are still being finalized and whose outcomes will be published via ad hoc document, acknowledge the activities carried out for each component and provides an analysis of the outcomes and observation by the consultants. The latter then inform the recommendations, which are aimed at strengthening and improving the effectiveness of Eni’s Human Rights Action Plan activities. The issues discussed during consultations and interview campaigns have mainly involved: communication about the project, strengthened engagement, compensation management, accessibility of grievance mechanism and other company’s channels.

 

All the inputs are being processed and analysed and will be considered for programming next activities in the area. Among the feedback received, fishers reported that fishing boats have to travel out further from the coast with, as a result, an increasing in gasoline use and overall costs. The situation, which is caused by different factors (including overexploitation), is being managed by Eni through different activities, such as incorporating fishers in its local development program, granting fisher’s equipment, and developing projects on alternatives to improve the productivity of the fishing sector. In this regard, interviews have also reported the need of better explaining and describe these activities to communities, to make sure the benefit are not perceived as not distributed fairly. Eni will work on improving its communication and engagement strategy with them.

 

 

a) Among the stakeholders consulted: Asociación de Padres de Familia de Sánchez Magallanes; Asociación de Padres de Familia de San Rafael; Capitánia de Puerto de Sánchez Magallanes; CONAPESCA (Comisión Nacional de Acuacultura y Pesca); Municipio de Cardenas - Departamento Jurídico; Municipal delegates of Ojoshal and Villa y Puerto Andrés Sánchez Magallanes; PROEDU Community Worker (Sánchez Magallanes y San Rafael); Sánchez Magallanes Health Centre; Secretaría de Desarrollo Agropecuario, Forestal y Pesca del Estado de Tabasco (SEDAFOP); Secretaría para el Desarrollo Energético del Estado de Tabasco (SEDENER); Fishing cooperatives; Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco (UJAT); Zona Escolar, 46 teachers and 46 Supervisor.

The importance of the complaints mechanism

We have grievance mechanisms and reporting channels in place, both at our headquarters and at our operating sites, to ensure that any potential human rights violations are promptly identified, analysed, managed and, if substantiated, remedied. In particular, there are two specific tools within the company's regulatory system that can be used also in the event of alleged human rights violations:

●      the Grievance Mechanism, which consists of a set of procedures defined by Eni for the submission, in written or verbal form, of petitions or complaints relating to the activities carried out, as well as their management and resolution

●      Reporting, which consists of the possibility for anyone, whether an employee or a third party, to report, also confidentially or anonymously, issues related to the Internal Control System or other matters that violate the Code of Ethics, such as business ethics, mobbing, harassment, discrimination and respect for human rights.

We do not tolerate and are committed to preventing retaliation against employees and other stakeholders who report human rights concerns. We also cooperate with other judicial and non-judicial mechanisms, among them the national contact points established under the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises.

How to report abuses and violations

Eni allows anyone to send reports or alleged breaches of the Code of Ethics, guaranteeing confidentiality and anonymity.

Our commitment to human rights in figures

Numbers, activities and rankings on the issues we care about.

97%

of security contracts containing human rights clauses

100%

of new suppliers assessed according to social criteria

> 450

in-depth human rights, document and field audits on direct and indirect suppliers

> 38 k

training hours provided in the last three years on human rights

Commitments Main results 2023 Main targets Status
Eni is committed to respecting human rights in its activities and to promoting such respect with partners and stakeholders. This commitment is based on the dignity of every human being and on companies’ responsibility to contribute to the well-being of individuals and of local communities. • 100% of new projects with human rights risk assessed with specific analysis
• 170 participants from Security Forces in the Security & Human Rights workshop in Iraq
• 100% of new projects with human rights risk assessed with specific analysis
• 100% on-time completion of the actions outlined in the Action Plans
• Maintain position in the 10th decile of the Corporate Human Rights Benchmark
• Update of Eni’s salient issues
• On track
• On track
• On track

Our cooperation with international bodies

Our commitment to human rights and their promotion is also reflected in our cooperation with various international bodies. Here are some examples:

  • we adhere to the principles of the UN Global Compact
  • we cooperate with the International Training Centre, the International Labour Organisation's (ILO) training institute
  • we discuss sustainability issues with other O&G companies as part of IPIECA
  • we collaborate with the IHRB, an independent organisation and a global centre of excellence on the relationship between business and human rights
  • we cooperate with the United Nations Development Programme, FAO, Unesco.

Eni for 2023. Browse the interactive feature

Discover the sustainability report that brings together our goals, commitments and achievements for a socially just energy transition.

eni for just transition


Back to top
Back to top