OPV fotovoltaico stampabile su pellicola

OPV: photovoltaic cells that can be printed on film

Organic photovoltaic cells generate electricity from the sun using ultra-thin films of lightweight, strong and flexible photoactive polymers.

Technology

At Eni's Renewable Energy and Environmental R&D Centre, in conjunction with the Technical Research Center of Finland, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), National Research Council (CNR) and numerous universities in Italy, we have developed a system that generates electricity from the sun. It uses polymers and other organic components as photoactive materials and has the advantage of being able to use a very thin plastic film that is printable like newsprint. The advantage over current silicon technology is that far lighter and more flexible panels can be built, which can be integrated into different systems and situations at a reduced cost. A first practical application is being designed in Val d'Agri, as part of the Energy Valley programme, where OPV panels will power a horticultural crop greenhouse and a digital agro-meteorological control unit. Compared to conventional photovoltaics, organic photovoltaics are also superior in terms of environmental impact and disposal costs. In addition, compared to traditional solar panels, both the environmental impact and cost of disposal are also lower. By way of comparison, a kilo of crystalline silicon is enough to produce just over 2m2 of solar panels, while the same quantity of organic material used in OPVs is enough to cover an entire football pitch with solar panels.

Context

Solar is one of the most promising renewable energies. Some of its features, however, limit its widespread use. Currently used metal and glass panels with silicon cells require supports strong enough to hold their weight. Furthermore, the modules must be installed facing south and at the correct angle according to the site's latitude. Installation and maintenance of such equipment is costly and requires specialised expertise. Our OPV technology's lightness, flexibility and sturdiness means it can be installed almost anywhere, including on inflatable supports, which can even be launched by parachute. In this way, solar energy could even be taken to inaccessible places without requiring additional infrastructure.

I VOLTI DI ENI#2 - Energia nanometrica

ENI'S FACES#1 - Nanometric energy

Technological challenge

Cost-effective and versatile, OPV technology has great potential for integration into our industrial operations. Installed on buildings and industrial plants, it can help to achieve energy self-sufficiency in operations in remote places. It is ideal for powering sensors and recharging mobile devices where a connection to an electricity grid may not be immediately available. Outside of our industry, we are also focusing on Building-Integrated PhotoVoltaics (BIPV), a new concept in construction where solar cells aren't installed on the building, but built into its structural elements: bricks, roof and floor tiles and other structures, such as noise barriers or any surface exposed to light.

Uomo che osserva il supercomputer HPC5

SUPERFAST#3 - Goal: clean energy

Industrial integration

Cost-effective and versatile, OPV technology has great potential for integration into our industrial operations. Installed on buildings and industrial plants, it can help to achieve energy self-sufficiency in operations in remote places. It is ideal for powering sensors and recharging mobile devices where a connection to an electricity grid may not be immediately available. The double micro-pilot system being designed in Val d'Agri in the area of precision agriculture, is a concrete example of how the technology can be applied. In this case, a first set of thirty OPV panels will be integrated into a horticultural crop greenhouse, while a further set will power a digital agro-meteorological control unit equipped with ten sensors. Conceived in collaboration with Eni's R&D unit, the overall project is part of the CASF - the agricultural experimentation and training centre project and, more generally, the Energy Valley programme, a district we are creating in the area of the Centro Olio Val d’Agri to encourage economic diversification, environmental sustainability and the circular economy. Outside of our industry, we are also focusing on Building-Integrated PhotoVoltaics (BIPV), a new concept in construction where solar cells aren't installed on the building, but built into its structural elements: bricks, roof and floor tiles and other structures, such as noise barriers or any surface exposed to light.

Environmental impact

Beyond its industrial uses, the most interesting opportunities for our OPV technology concern local development and humanitarian intervention. For example, bringing electricity, albeit low power, to isolated communities without requiring large technical resources in situ. Given its cost-effectiveness and ease of use, in fact, OPV installation and operation does not require any specialist skills. By applying the film to inflatable structures, it would be possible to air-drop small photovoltaic installations into areas not connected to the electricity grid, following incidents or disasters for example: This would make it possible to power lighting, diagnostic systems, and emergency radio or telephones.